In search of a peace system
1. Introduction. The starry sky at all times occupied the imagination of people. Why do stars light up? How many of them shine in the night? Are they far from…

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Big Big Bang Challenges
Upon careful consideration, the cosmological theory of the origin and structure of the universe begins to crack at the seams. Take a look at the starry night sky. How did…

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What about the galaxies?
We have already seen that all attempts by cosmologists to squeeze the Universe into the narrow framework of their materialistic ideas have led to nothing. Moreover, their theories do not…

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relief forms

The origin of the moon

The history of the evolution of the moon is interesting not only in itself, but also as part of the general problem of the origin of the Earth and other planets of the solar system. Recently, we have learned a lot about the physical and chemical characteristics of the moon. These data were obtained not only from the Earth, but also with the help of spacecraft. For example, the automatic stations Surveyor-5, -6, and -7, which made a soft landing on the moon in 1967 and 1968, made it possible for the first time to determine its chemical composition. Samples of lunar rocks delivered by American astronauts under the Apollo program (1969–1972) and Soviet automatic devices of the Luna series (1970–1976) made it possible to measure their chemical and physical characteristics in detail and determine the age of the moon . Continue reading

Uranus and Neptune

Uranus is the seventh planet from the Sun in the solar system. In diameter, it is almost four times larger than the Earth. Very far from the Sun and relatively poorly lit. Uranus was discovered by the English scientist W. Herschel in 1781. It is not possible to distinguish any details on the surface of Uranus due to the small angular dimensions of the planet in the field of view of the telescope. This complicates his research, including the study of the laws of rotation. Apparently, Uranus (unlike all other planets) rotates around its axis as if lying on its side. Such an inclination of the equator creates unusual lighting conditions: at the poles in a certain season, the sun’s rays fall almost vertically, and the polar day and polar night cover (alternately) the entire surface of the planet, except for a narrow strip along the equator. Since Uranus Continue reading

Saturn

Saturn is the second largest among the planets of the solar system. Its equatorial diameter is only slightly smaller than that of Jupiter, but Saturn is more than three times as massive as Jupiter and has a very low average density – about 0.7 g / cm3. The low density is due to the fact that the giant planets are composed mainly of hydrogen and helium. Moreover, in the bowels of Saturn, the pressure does not reach such high values ​​as on Jupiter, so the density of matter there is less. Spectroscopic studies found some molecules in Saturn’s atmosphere. The surface temperature of the clouds on Saturn is close to the melting point of methane (-184 ° C), of which the cloud layer of the planet most likely consists of solid particles. Dark bands elongated along the equator, also called belts, and bright zones are visible through the telescope, Continue reading

Giant planets
Jupiter, the fifth largest in the distance from the Sun and the largest planet in the Solar System, is 5.2 times farther from the Sun than the Earth, and spends…

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Asteroid temperature
Asteroids are through and through cold, lifeless bodies. In the distant past, their bowels could be warm and even hot due to radioactive or some other heat sources. Since then,…

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The sun
The sun - the central body of the solar system - is a hot plasma ball. The sun is the star closest to Earth. The light from it reaches us…

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Hubble Space Telescope
From the very beginning of astronomy, from the time of Galileo, astronomers have one common goal: to see more, to see further, to see deeper. And the Hubble Space Telescope,…

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