Giant planets
Jupiter, the fifth largest in the distance from the Sun and the largest planet in the Solar System, is 5.2 times farther from the Sun than the Earth, and spends…

Continue reading →

Uranus and Neptune
Uranus is the seventh planet from the Sun in the solar system. In diameter, it is almost four times larger than the Earth. Very far from the Sun and relatively…

Continue reading →

Lunar mineralogy
How did lunar craters form? This issue has led to a long discussion between supporters of two hypotheses on the origin of lunar craters: volcanic and meteorite. According to the…

Continue reading →

large planets

Giant leap into space exploration

How did the work of the first American expedition on the lunar surface begin? Immediately after the ship landed on the plain of the lunar Sea of ​​Tranquility, the Apollo 11 commander Neil Armstrong told the Mission Control Center via radio: “Houston, here is Tranquility Base. The eagle has landed ”(Eagle,“ Eagle ”, called the lunar ship,“ landed ”meant landing on the lunar firmament,“ earth ”, and the landing point was called the Base of Tranquility after the vast lunar plain – Sea of ​​Tranquility).

After that, the astronauts checked all the systems of the lunar module in case of an unexpected launch. Next, according to the plan, there was a dream lasting 4 hours. And here the astronauts in violation of the program asked permission to begin access to the moon immediately. It has been received. Barely touching the lunar surface with the left boot of his Continue reading

Man on the moon

Work on this program began in the USA in the late 60s. It was decided to carry out a man’s flight to the moon and his successful return to Earth over the next ten years. In the summer of 1962, after lengthy discussions, they came to the conclusion that the most efficient and reliable way is to place the complex in the command and computing module, which includes the command and auxiliary modules, and the lunar landing module into the lunar orbit. The first priority was the creation of a launch vehicle capable of introducing at least 300 tons into low Earth orbit and at least 100 tons into low Earth orbit. At the same time, the development of the Apollo spacecraft, designed for the flight of American astronauts to the moon, was underway. In February 1966, the Apollo was tested in an unmanned version. Continue reading

Lunar eclipses

When, when moving around the Earth, the Moon falls into the cone of the earth’s shadow, which is cast by the globe illuminated by the Sun, a total lunar eclipse occurs. If only a part of the Moon plunges into the shadow of the Earth, then a partial eclipse occurs. A total lunar eclipse can last about 1.5 to 2 hours. It can be observed from all over the night hemisphere of the Earth, where the moon is above the horizon at the time of the eclipse. Therefore, in any area, full lunar eclipses can be observed much more often than solar ones.
During a total lunar eclipse of the moon, the lunar disk remains visible, but it usually acquires a dark red hue. This phenomenon is explained by the refraction of sunlight in the earth’s atmosphere. Passing through the earth’s atmosphere, the sun’s rays are scattered and refracted. Moreover, mainly short-wave radiation is Continue reading

Moon relief
Traditionally, two main types of landscape — continents and the sea — stand out on the moon. The prevailing shape of the relief of the lunar surface is the lunar…

...

Lunar mineralogy
How did lunar craters form? This issue has led to a long discussion between supporters of two hypotheses on the origin of lunar craters: volcanic and meteorite. According to the…

...

The history of the discovery of Pluto
In the 1840s, with the help of Newtonian mechanics, Urbain Le Verrier predicted the position of the then undetected planet Neptune based on an analysis of perturbations of the orbit…

...

Planet Venus - History of Research
Venus was known to people from ancient times. (See a brief description of this planet and interesting facts about it.) It received its modern name in honor of the Roman…

...